Dive Sites

Palau’s most famous dive sites

Palau Dive Sites
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Reef Diving


Wreck Diving







Big Drop-Off & Ngemelis Wall

Dive Site

  • Sheer vertical wall, running along the whole length of Ngemelis Island, in some places only a few feet away from the island
  • The edge of the reef drops straight down to 900 feet.
  • One of Jacques Cousteau’s favorite wall dives.
  • Close to the mooring buoy, a large chain connected to a 6 foot steel sphere can be seen. This chain and ball was used during WWII to prevent the Japanese from entering the waterway leading to German Channel.

Marine Life

  • Gorgeous Soft Corals, Leather Corals and Fans
  • Schools of Pyramid Butterfly Fish and Square Spot Anthias forage for plankton just off the wall.
  • Moorish Idols, Sergeant Majors, Yellowtail Fusiliers and a variety of Angelfish are found along the edge of the reef.
  • Gray Reef, White Tip, and solitary Leopard Sharks patrolling back and forth along the drop-off.
  • White Tip Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Leopard Sharks can be seen sleeping on the sandy bottom.
  • The very well-camouflaged Leaf Fish, Stonefish and Lionfish.
  • Green and Hawksbill Turtles.
  • Anemones and many colorful reef fish on the reef top.

Important Tips

  • A popular lunch and snorkel location, take care when surfacing and listen for the sound of speedboats overhead.
  • Use a safety marker buoy for your protection.

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Blue Corner

Dive Site

  • The corner is a flat plateau, running a couple of hundred yards out to sea before dropping off abruptly.
  • Consistently active with big and little fish action due to strong tidal currents.
  • Small hills, sand tunnels and gorges cut into the reef.
  • Depending on the direction of the current, the pelagic fish will switch from one side of the corner to the other.

Marine Life

  • Gray Reef Sharks and White Tip Reef Sharks, Blue Fin and Big eye Trevallies, large schools of Jacks and Snappers, Hawksbill and Green Turtles, Groupers, schools of Barracuda, a variety of small tropical fish, Napoleon Wrasse, Bump-head Parrotfish, Moray Eels, Mackerel, Wahoo and, on occasions, spotted Eagle Rays.
  • The critter list is almost endless: Leafy Scorpionfish, Nudibranchs, Lionfish, Anemone Fish.
  • Bigger pelagics are occasionally seen at the deeper reaches of Blue Corner: Hammerheads, Bull Sharks, Tiger and Whale Sharks, Marlin, Sailfish, Whales, Mantas, schooling Yellowfin and Dog Tooth Tuna.

Important Tips

  • Take care when hooking in; look for dead coral or rock to hook onto.
  • Always inflate a little to prevent yourself from crashing on top of the reef.
  • Use of safety marker buoy is mandatory.

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Blue Holes

Dive Site

  • Four vertical shafts that open on top of the reef into a large cavern with an exit on the outer reef wall.
  • It is common on an outgoing tide to dive through the Blue Holes and continue on to Blue Corner.
  • The cavern and holes were formed by fresh water erosion millions of years ago, when water levels were much lower than they are today.

Marine Life

  • Tubastrea, Wire and Black Coral adorn the walls of the Blue Holes.
  • White Tip Reef sharks and Leopard Sharks can be seen sleeping on the sandy bottom of the cave, or just outside the exit.
  • Special critters found inside the Blue Holes are the Flaming Scallop, Leafy Scorpionfish, Dart Fish, Nudibranchs and Cleaner Shrimps.
  • Wahoos, Barracudas, Dog-tooth Tuna, White tips and Gray Reef sharks patrol the exit.

Important Tips

  • Watch your depth and bottom time inside the cavern.
  • Currents at Blue Corner and Blue Holes are strongest and hardest to predict during Half Moon.
  • May have to swim against the current for about 150 feet. When you pass the second buoy, the current will reverse and carry you to Blue Corner.

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Chandelier Cave

Dive Site

  • A cave system made up of five separate, connecting chambers with air pockets (4 are water-filled).
  • Over the millenniums, rainwater, percolating down through the limestone, eroded the interior of the islands, forming vast cave systems.
  • Chandelier Cave was once an open-air cave.
  • The stalactites and stalagmites slowly grew into formations resembling glittering chandeliers.
  • After the last ice age, the water level slowly rose, completely concealing the cave's entrance.
  • 3 depth charges from WWII can be found on the left of the entrance.
  • Halocline inside the cave (mixing of salt and freshwater or sediment, creating a layered effect).

Marine Life

  • Soldier Fish and Cardinal Fish inside the cave.
  • Small shrimp and crabs that cling to the sponges found along the walls.
  • The elusive Mandarin Fish and other small reef fish around the cave's entrance.

Important Tips

  • Bring a torch, as a light is a must.
  • Mind your head when surfacing in the air pockets. Stalactites can hurt!
  • Divers who are claustrophobic and/or have concerns about diving in darkness, should avoid this dive.

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Devil Fish City

Dive Site

  • Famous for its Manta Rays, generally between January and April.
  • 3 cleaning stations.
  • Best during slack high tide or incoming tide.

Marine Life

  • Sides of the channel are lined with massive fields of sea whips, sea fans, soft corals, and large stands of evergreen Tubastrea corals.
  • Highlights are cleaning stations where Manta Rays hover while Cleaner Wrasse and Butterfly Fish rid them of parasitic isopods living in and around their mouth, gills and belly.
  • Coral heads are adorned with hundreds of copper Sweeper Baitfish.
  • Rainbow Runners, Reef Sharks, Bumphead Parrotfish, Black Snappers, Black-Bar Barracudas, Unicorn Fish, Striped Skipjacks, Fusiliers, Crocodile Fish, Nudibranchs, Leafy Scorpionfish.

Important Tips

  • Sit low and still around the cleaning station.
  • Mantas do not like to be approached quickly.
  • Keep your distance and let the Mantas come and go.
  • Patience is the name of the game.
  • Reef hook is highly advised, as currents can be strong.
  • This is a specialty tour for advanced divers only; additional charges apply. 
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German Channel

Dive Site

  • During the German occupation of Palau, guano (phosphate) was mined on the southern island of Angaur.
  • In order to bring guano to town, the Germans blasted and dredged a channel that connected the inner lagoon with the open ocean.
  • The outside mouth is dived on the incoming tide, when nutrient- and plankton-rich current flows into the inner lagoon.
  • Known for Manta Rays, schooling sharks and an abundance of tropical fish.

Marine Life

  • Schooling Jacks, Barracudas, Trevallies and Snappers.
  • Cuttlefish and Black Tip reef sharks in the shallows.
  • Sandy bottom is home to Garden Eels and Blind Gobies.
  • Mantas can usually be seen feeding on plankton at the mouth of the channel.
  • Both Mantas and Reef sharks are know to get cleaned by Cleaner Wrasse and Butterfly fish at the cleaning stations in the late afternoon.
  • Mantas will approach a cleaning station a couple of times before they hover over the station to get cleaned.

Important Tips

  • Speed boats cross this narrow pass daily. Be extremely cautious while ascending to the surface.
  • Always use a safety marker buoy during safety stops.
  • Do not chase the Mantas, as they will leave and not return. Be patient.

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New Drop-Off

Dive Site

  • Two reef walls meet here to create a dramatic corner with a plateau, before dropping into the abyss.

Marine Life

  • Schooling Blue Stripe Snappers, Black Snappers, Napoleon Wrasse, Barracudas, Spotted Eagle Ray, 6-Banded Angelfish, Regal and Emperor Angelfish, Hawksbill and Green Turtles.
  • Clouds of Pyramid Butterfly Fish, Square Spot Anthias, Redtooth Triggerfish, Moorish Idols, Sergeant Majors and Yellowtail Fusiliers along the reef edge.
  • Gray and Whitetip Reef sharks patrolling the wall and corner.
  • Search for Leafy Scorpionfish, Moray Eels, nudibranchs and turtles on the plateau.
  • Sea anemones along the upper reaches of the wall.
  • Very large Gorgonian fans and healthy soft corals on the sheer reef walls.

Important Tips

  • Watch your depth gauge.
  • Unpredictable and strong currents.
  • Listen for boat traffic when surfacing.
  • Use of reef hook and safety marker buoy.

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Ngedbus Coral Garden, Wall & Corner

Dive Site

  • At Ngedbus Coral Garden, many deep canyons and crevices cut the slope and are home to a large variety of marine life.
  • There is usually no current present. Visibility is best during incoming tide.
  • A gentle coral slope drops from the top of the reef down to 75 feet, before it changes to a ridge of broken corals and sand.
  • Ngedbus Wall is a sheer reef drop.
  • At Ngedbus Corner, a small plateau at around 25 feet extends out from the wall.

Marine Life

  • Crocodile fish, Stingrays, Cuttlefish and the Ornate Eagle Ray are commonly seen.
  • Schools of Black Tip Reef Sharks usually come up close at the Coral Garden.
  • Many Gray Reef Sharks patrol the walls and circle around the corner.
  • Along the reef's edge, Pyramid Butterfly Fish and myriads of Redtoothed Triggerfish congregate.
  • Schools of Barracuda, Rudderfish, Snappers, Napoleon Wrasse, Lionfish, Emperors, Puffers, Turtles, as well as big pods of Spinner Dolphins can be seen.
  • Sea fans, Whip and Wire corals, healthy soft corals.

Important Tips

  • If the current is strong, hook on to the plateau at approximately 25 feet and enjoy the show.
  • Use of safety marker buoy and reef hook at the Corner.
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Ngerong Outside & Inside

Dive Site

  • Ngerchong Outside Wall is a steep drop-off.
  • It gets shallow and wide at the entrance to Denges Channel, also known as Ngerchong Channel.
  • Shaped like a horseshoe and with a sandy bottom, Ngerchong Inside curves toward Denges channel and is protected by the outer reef wall.

Marine Life

  • Wall is covered with a variety of soft and hard corals.
  • Look for Gray Reef Sharks, Black Tips, White Tips and sometimes Leopard Sharks.
  • September-November, Ngerchong Outside is a nursery for baby Gray Reef Sharks. Look for large schools of juvenile sharks around 10 inches long at around 60 feet, accompanied by an adult female.
  • Cleaning stations can be found along the face of the reef wall around 60 feet.
  • At Ngerchong Inside, Cuttlefish can be seen year round as it is a breeding and hatching ground. Females will lay dozens of 2-inch long grape-shaped white eggs among branching hard corals. She will hover around her nest until the eggs hatch. To locate the cuttlefish, swim along the edge of the reef where it meets the sandy bottom, and stay 3-6 feet off the bottom. Cuttlefish are masters of disguise.
  • Shrimp, Crab, Nudibranchs, Feather worms, Garden Eels and many shells, turtles and, occasionally, Mantas or Sting Rays.

Important Tips

  • Use of safety marker buoy and reef hook.

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Peleliu Express & Yellow Wall

Dive Site

  • Yellow Wall is a vertical wall that runs parallel to the southern tip of Peleliu Island.
  • Yellow Wall is named after the golden yellow tube corals that cover the wall along this area of the reef.
  • The reef has a number of crevices, arches and small caverns to explore.
  • At approximately 100 feet, the reef forms a plateau before dropping off thousands of feet.
  • The Peleliu Express is famous for its ripping currents that can seemingly come out of nowhere and change direction without warning. When the current is running, this site is considered the ultimate in drift dives. During Full and New Moon, the currents are more severe.

Marine Life

  • The strong currents at this point attract many pelagics like Sharks, Barracuda, Tuna, Rays, huge Giant Groupers and Napoleon Wrasse, Oriental Sweetlips, Palette Surgeonfish and large Rainbow Runners.
  • Schools of Jacks, Snappers, Redtoothed Triggerfish, Anthias and Pyramid Butterfly fish along the edge.
  • The top of the reef abounds with Sweetlips, Emperors, Wrasse, Groupers and Eels.
  • Green and Hawksbill Turtles eat the Yellow Tube Corals.
  • Rare sightings of Blue Marlins, Sailfish, Whalesharks, pods of Sperm Whales, Pilot Whales and Orcas.

Important Tips

  • For experienced and advanced divers only.
  • Use of safety marker buoy and reef hook are mandatory.
  • Stay with your group at all times when diving the Express.
  • This is a specialty tour for advanced divers only; additional charges apply.

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Peleliu Wall & Cut

Dive Site

  • Peleliu Wall is one of the deepest and most beautiful wall dives in Palau.
  • Deep canyons, crevices and caves cut into the wall, offering hideouts and shelter to a large variety of marine life.
  • Peleliu Cut is where the ocean currents flowing around the archipelago converge, making up some of the strongest currents you will experience in Palau.
  • Due to the unpredictability and strength of currents, the Peleliu Cut is considered an advanced drift dive.

Marine Life

  • Famous for large pelagic fish action.
  • Bright yellow soft corals, wire and whip coral, bushes of Black Coral and huge sea fans cover the walls.
  • Gray Reef Sharks, White Tip Sharks, Barracudas and Jacks.
  • On rare occasions, Sailfish, Marlin, Bull sharks, Silver Tips, Hammerheads, Tiger sharks, Sperm Whales and Orcas have been spotted.
  • The plateau and reef's edge host large numbers of tropical fish, including Pyramid Butterfly Fish, Square Spot Anthias, Moorish Idols, Sergeant Majors, Yellowtail Fusiliers, Palette Surgeonfish, Bumphead Parrotfish, Triggerfish, Leafy Scorpionfish and Purple Anthias.

Important Tips

  • Safety marker buoys are mandatory.
  • Stay with your group and guide at all times when diving the Peleliu Cut.

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Shark City

Dive Site

  • Shark City consists of sheer vertical walls, moderate slopes and canyons. The reef creates a corner with a plateau on the top.
  • This finger-shaped reef is Palau’s western most point.

Marine Life

  • Gray Reef Sharks, schools of Barracuda, Snappers and Unicorn fish patrol the walls and corner.
  • Pyramid Butterfly Fish, Square Anthias, Moorish Idols, Napoleon Wrasse, Spotted Eagle Rays and Yellowtail Fusiliers, large schools of silver Barracuda, Big-Eye Trevallies and Black Snappers.
  • Large patches of Lettuce Corals and Staghorn Corals can be found on top of the plateau and the canyons boast huge Gorgonian Fans.
  • Rare visitors include Bull Sharks, Silver Tips and Hammerhead Sharks.

Important Tips

  • Watch your air consumption and bottom time.
  • Due to strong currents and open ocean swells, each diver is required to carry a safety marker buoy.

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Short Drop-Off

Dive Site

  • A steep reef wall turning toward the open sea. At the corner, the drop off will gradually change to a massive deep plateau.
  • Got its name due to its proximity to Koror.

Marine Life

  • White Tips, Gray Reef and Black Tip Reef Sharks.
  • Large variety of soft and hard corals.
  • Large schools of Batfish, Blue Tail Jacks, Parrotfish, Butterfly Fish and wrasses.
  • Eagle Rays and Octopus.
  • During September to November, this is a nursery for baby Gray Reef Sharks. Schools of juvenile sharks, 10 inches in length accompanied by an adult female, patrol the water at around 100 feet.
  • This site is also where lucky divers might see the Chambered Nautilus. Nautilus live in depths exceeding 600 feet and come up to the shallows to feed at night. Nautilus are found only near the equator and prefer near-freezing water temperature. They are believed to not have changed in over 400 million years.

Important Tips

  • Use of safety marker buoy.

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Siaes Corner, Wall & Tunnel

Dive Site

  • Siaes Tunnel is an enormous, deep underwater cavern with 3 openings into the chamber from the side of the reef wall.
  • The floor of Siaes Tunnel was, at one time, at sea level. A ledge around the 100 feet mark is where the ocean, during the last Ice Age, used to strike the shallow reef.
  • The outside wall drops vertically to around 150 feet, before it slopes off hundreds of feet to the ocean floor.
  • Siaes Corner is perched over a deep blue abyss where currents can get very strong. 

Marine Life in the Tunnel

  • White Tip Reef Sharks and Stingrays resting on the sandy bottom in the cavern.
  • Pyramid Butterfly Fish, Anthias and schools of Big-Eye Trevallies and Snappers at the entrance.
  • Bushes of Black Coral, Soft Coral and Gorgonian Fans.
  • Rare Angelfish hide among the crevices at the top of the cavern (notably, the Blue-Black Pygmy Angelfish, Multicolor Pygmy Angelfish and Colin’s Angelfish), Rare Burgess Butterfly fish, Decorated Dartfish and Helfrich’s Dartfish.
  • Gobies and shrimps on the sandy cave floor.

Marine Life on the Wall and Corner

  • At incoming tide, large schools of Gray Reef Sharks, Barracuda and Jacks can be seen patrolling the edge of the reef.
  • Green and Hawksbill Turtles, Square Anthias, Sergeant Majors, Pyramid Butterfly fish, Moorish Idols, Anthias, Angelfish and Yellowtail Fusiliers are found in abundance along the edge.

Important Tips

  • Bring a dive light.
  • As you reach the Corner, slowly ascend to the top of the plateau. Currents can get very strong. Use of reef hook and safety marker buoy are mandatory.

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Turtle Cove & Barnum’s Wall

Dive Site

  • The reef extends out to a plateau from and around Ngercheu Island.
  • On top of the reef at Turtle Cove is a mini blue hole that forms a large cavern.
  • Numerous small caves, arches and ledges.
  • Turtle Cove is a vertical reef wall.
  • Currents can be strong at the corner.
  • At Barnum’s Wall, the reef moderately slopes down and then changes its formation into a rough sandy run-off. Before the reef reaches the corner, it changes to a sheer wall.

Marine Life

  • Schools of Big Eye Jacks, Striped and Black Snappers, Goatfish, Pyramid Butterfly Fish, Hawkfish, Square Spot Anthias, Moorish Idols, Titan Triggerfish, Anemones, a variety of Angelfish and Yellowtail Fusiliers.
  • Different species of Nudibranchs.
  • Gray Reef Sharks and White Tips patrol the reef top.
  • Turtles, large Groupers, Sweetlips.
  • White Tip Reef Sharks and Leopard Sharks like to rest on the sandy run-off.
  • Gorgonian Fans, Crinoids, Soft and Leather Corals.

Important Tips

  • Use of safety marker buoy and reef hook.
  • Caution when surfacing due to heavy boat traffic.

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Turtle Wall

Dive Site

  • Turtle Wall is the central part of a vertical wall that runs along the whole length of Ngemelis Island.
  • The reef is extremely deep, descending to over 900 feet.
  • A popular gathering site for Green and Hawksbill turtles.

Marine Life

  • Turtles, turtles and more turtles! This is one of the few dive sites that live up to its name. You will almost always see turtles swimming, eating, sleeping and sometimes you can even see them mating. Male turtles have a noticeable tail, whereas females have no visible tails.
  • Pyramid Butterfly Fish, Square Spot Anthias, Moorish Idols, Yellowtail Fusiliers and Snappers are found all along the edge and top of the reef.
  • Schools of Rainbow Runners, Gray and White Tip Reef Sharks, Fusiliers and Napoleon Wrasse.
  • Tubastrea and small hard corals adorn the wall. Deeper down, sea fans, soft coral colonies and sea whips are found.

Important Tips

  • Take caution when surfacing. Use a safety marker buoy to alert boat drivers of your position. 

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Ulong Channel

Dive Site

  • The barrier reef runs perpendicular to Ulong Channel.
  • The sandy bottom of the channel is decorated with numerous coral heads and coral formations.
  • The sides of the channel start just below the surface and gradually slope toward the sandy bottom.
  • Currents can be strong and unpredictable.

Marine Life

  • During incoming tides, Gray Reef Sharks, Sting Rays, schools of Jacks, Snappers, Barracuda and Batfish patrol the mouth of the Channel.
  • During Full Moon, between April to July, thousands of Groupers gather here to spawn.
  • When Titan and Yellow-Margin Triggerfish are nesting in the Channel, they become extremely territorial and protective of their nest sites. They will dig out large grooves in the sandy bottom to lay their eggs.
  • An enormous Lettuce Coral that has grown from the bottom of the channel to a height of 15-20 ft.
  • Turtles, Reindeer Wrasse and small reef fish.
  • Huge Giant Clams and Whip Corals.

Important Tips

  • Use of safety marker buoy. 
  • Use of reef hook.
  • Watch out for those nesting Triggerfish! 

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Virgin Blue Hole

Dive Site

  • A single opening on the shallow reef extending as a vertical shaft 28-30 m/90-98 ft deep.
  • The hole, about 8 m/25 ft in diameter, turns into a large tunnel approximately 35 m/115 ft long, with an exit to the outer reef wall.
  • After exiting, continue to swim along the reef wall.
  • The tunnel and hole were formed by fresh water erosion millions of years ago, when water levels were much lower than they are today. 
  • It is common to dive Virgin Blue Hole at incoming tide.

Marine Life

  • Tubastrea, Wire and Black coral adorn the walls of Virgin Blue Hole.
  • White Tip Reef Sharks and Leopard Sharks can be seen sleeping on the sandy bottom of the cave, or just outside the exit.
  • Many species of nudibranchs and shells can be found along the sandy bottom.
  • Special critters inside are the Flaming Scallop, Leafy Scorpionfish, Dartfish, Nudibranchs and Cleaner Shrimp.
  • Wahoos, Barracudas, Dog-tooth Tuna, White Tip and Gray Reef Sharks patrol the exit.

Important Tips

  • Watch your depth and bottom time inside the tunnel.
  • For those using nitrox, analyze your tank to ensure that you won’t exceed your maximum operating depth (MOD).

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Amatsu Maru

  • Use of safety marker buoy.
  • Use of reef hook.
  • Keep your distance from nesting Triggerfish!!! 

History

  • Largest shipwreck in Micronesia and the deepest Japanese wreck in Palau.
  • The 10,000-ton oil tanker sank during Operation Desecrate One on March 30-31, 1944.
  • Hit directly by several 1000 lb bombs.
  • She was partially salvaged after the war in 1950.
  • 2 lives were lost in the salvage attempt when cutting through the plates and the flames hit trapped gases.
  • Recovery of 8,000 gallons of oil.
  • Scrap metal that was salvaged sank to the bottom of South China Sea when entire Japanese fleet was hit by a tornado 

Artifacts

  • Pipes, hoses and large valves used for loading and unloading the oils and fuels are visible near the bridge.
  • Instruments in the navigational deck.
  • The deck below the wheelhouse contains radio equipment, wiring, light fixtures, electrical panels. 

Armament

  • Twisted remains of a circular gun platform at the stern.

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Bichu Maru

Marine Life

  • Black coral growth, with some trees up to 6-8 ft in size, sponges and soft coral.
  • Lionfish and a variety of small reef fish.

Important Tips

  • Watch your depth gauge and bottom time. 

History

  • Medium-sized Japanese army cargo ship.
  • Built in 1942-43.
  • A torpedo hit to the hull sunk the ship on March 30, 1944.
  • Lies on its port side.
  • Starboard anchor still in stowed position.
  • Holds are all empty.

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Buoy 6 Wreck

Dive Site

  • The wreck, a small fishing vessel, used in WWII as a submarine chaser, is resting upright near Channel Marker 6.
  • From 1941 onward, some 200 auxiliary submarine chasers of this class were built.
  • Currents can be extremely strong, but one can find shelter on the leeward side of the wreck.
  • Best to dive at slack high tide.

Marine Life

  • Crocodile fish , Batfish, Octopus, Cuttlefish, Whitecap Shrimp and Nudibranchs.
  • Surrounding shallow patch reef are Sponges, Staghorn Lettuce, Brain and Table Corals, small Sea Whips and colorful juvenile tropical fish.

Important Tips

  • DO NOT PICK UP AMMUNITION!!! Very unstable and can explode. 

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Chuyo Maru

Marine Life

  • Juvenile Harlequin Sweetlips, 6-banded Angelfish, White Pyramid Angelfish, Purple-Tipped Anemone, Skunk Clownfish, Sennet Barracuda and large varieties of tropical fish and shrimps.

Important Tips

  • DO NOT PICK UP ANY AMMUNITION!!! Very unstable and can explode.
  • Move slowly over and in the wreck; sediment is thick and hence visibility will reduce quickly. 

History

  • Medium-sized Japanese coastal freighter.
  • Bombed during Operation Desecrate One on March 31, 1944.
  • 1st hit on the port side amidship by a 500 lb bomb.
  • After another 2 bomb hits, she sank on April 1, 1944.
  • Rests upright. 

Artifacts

  • Remains of the brass compass and ship’s telegraph in the bridge.
  • 2 anchors on the port side of the deck.
  • In the 1990s, a fishing boat snagged the Chuyo anchor. Its anchor broke trying to lift both anchors.
  • All holds are empty. 

Armament

  • Stern gun: standard short barrel, 12 cm/4.7 in, 1.86-ton, maximum range of 17,388 feet.
  • 4 ammunition boxes and 2 depth charge launchers both containing a depth charge.

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Helmet Wreck

Marine Life

  • Heavy Black Coral, Cock’s Comb Oysters and soft coral growth line the rails and deck.
  • Large numbers of translucent shrimps and Lionfish.
  • Banded Pipefish, Shrimp, Tomato Anemone Fish and Tridacna clams, Stonefish and Yellow Ribbon Eel on fore and aft mast.

Important Tips

  • DO NOT PICK UP ANY AMMUNITION!
  • Watch your depth gauge and bottom time. 

History

  • Small old-fashioned coaster.
  • Names: Depth Charge Wreck, X1 or Helmet Wreck.
  • Has no documented name, it is thought that the Japanese confiscated the ship in Southeast Asia.
  • Torpedo hit to aft stern during Desecrate One Operation.
  • To sink, it took seven 500 lb bombs and 4 rockets. 

Artifacts

  • Stern hold: helmets, gas mask, belts and shoes.
  • Bow holds: 3 radial engines for Zeke fighters, electrical wires, brass lanterns, medicine bottles, Kirin Beer bottles and ceramic Sake bottles. 

Armament

  • Depth charges, carbine rifle, machine guns, ammunition stacks found in the stern hold.
  • Collapsed gun mount on the stern.
  • 2 depth charge release boxes located on each side of the stern platform, with their lethal charges still inside.

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Iro Maru

Marine Life

  • Cleaner Shrimp, Charlotte Shrimp, Banded Pipefish, Lionfish and a variety of small reef fish.
  • Rich coral formations of Staghorn, Brain and Lettuce Corals surround the ship.

Important Tips

  • DO NOT PICK UP ANY AMMUNITION!!! Very unstable and can explode.
  • Move slowly over
  • In the wreck, sediment is thick and visibility will demise quickly. 

History

  • Japanese Navy Oiler. Old-fashioned fleet supply vessel.
  • Damaged by a US submarine torpedo attack on its way from the Philippines to Palau. The bow displays a large crescent where the torpedo hit.
  • Sunken on March 31, 1944, during Operation Desecrate One, when it was downed by an aerial bomb, damaging the aft section. 

Armament

  • 2 x 80 mm HA guns on platforms on the bow and stern. 

Artifacts

  • Oil drums and machinery in holds.

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Jake's Sea Plane

Marine Life

  • Batfish, Tomato Clownfish, Crocodile fish, Lionfish, 6-banded Angelfish, Big-Eye Trevallies, schooling Yellowtail Fusiliers.
  • Fully encrusted with a variety of hard corals (including Black Coral, Sponges, Sea Whips and Staghorn), clams and oysters. 
  • Jake's Sea Plane Depth: 45 ft/15 m. 

History

  • Japanese - Aichi E13A1-1 Navy Floatplane.
  • Built in 1941.
  • Long-range and high-speed reconnaissance seaplane.
  • 3-seat, single engine, twin float.
  • 15 hr maximum endurance.
  • Range of 1,128 nautical miles.
  • Primary role: bombing missions against land and shipping targets, air-sea rescues, staff transport and kamikaze sorties.
  • Destroyed in 1944 from a hit to the shafting at the aft.
  • Sits upright, mostly intact. 

Armament

  • A single 550 lb/250 kg bomb or four 132 lb/60 kg bombs or depth charges 

Artifacts

  • Radios and ammunition: small bomb inside cockpit to the right of the aft seat.

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Raizan Maru

Marine Life

  • The wreck is overgrown with hard and soft corals and home to many tropical fish.
  • A variety of nudibranchs can be found on the wreck.
  • In the shallow upper reef areas, a variety of soft and hard corals can be found on both slopes, including massive Gorgonian fans.
  • Clusters of green Tubastrea corals decorate the sandy bottom around the wreck.
  • A variety of Angelfish, Lionfish, Crocodile fish, Cuttlefish, Anemones, lots of silver and blue Chromis.

Important Tips

  • Use of safety marker buoy is required.
  • When ascending, follow the slope. Do not ascend in mid channel. Heavy boat traffic. 

History

  • Medium-sized Japanese cargo freighter.
  • Built in 1943.
  • Attacked by a Bunker Hill SBD (navy single-engine dive bomber) on March 30, 1944.
  • Heavily damaged: foreship lies 30 yards from the rest of the vessel.
  • Bow lays blown apart.
  • Slight damage to No. 2 hold.
  • Significant damage to engine room from bombing and salvage attempts.
  • Ship’s cargo containing 2,500 tons of nickel ore and scrap iron was recovered.
  • Stripped of all its upper superstructure, deck and hull. 

Artifacts

  • Aft of amid ship: loose coils of cable strewn about.

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Ryuko Maru

Marine Life

  • Octopus, Damsels, Blue-Green Chromis and many varieties of invertebrates.
  • Coral: platter, brain, sponge and soft.

Important Tips

  • Listen for boat traffic before surfacing.
  • Safety marker buoy is required as this dive site is in a high traffic area. 

History

  • Medium-sized Japanese cargo freighter.
  • Sister ship to Teshio and Raizan; built in 1942.
  • February 18, 1944: Ryuko burned in Truk Lagoon with a cargo of ammunition and survivors from Tatsuha Maru as a result of US air strikes.
  • March 4, 1944: Sailed to Woleai accompanied by 2 AK’s (cargo ships) and 3 escorts, then onto Palau.
  • Sunk in the air raids of March 30-31, 1944.
  • Lexington SB2C planes - 3 direct hits.
  • Resting on an even keel.
  • War damages to No. 3 hold only.
  • Engine room destroyed post war.
  • Port anchor and chain have been salvaged.
  • All structures on the forecastle and poop have been taken. 

Armament

  • Aft of the boat deck – AA guns are mounted.
  • Lots of spent AA shells lay on the surrounding floor.
  • Bombs found in shallow waters around ship.

Artifacts

  • Machine gun lies on the floor of the bridge in 4 inches of silt.
  • Salvaged: Ships wheel, rudder stand and telegraph.

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Teshio Maru

Marine Life

  • The ship is coated thickly with a multicolored carpet of corals, shells and sponges.
  • Turkey fish, Groupers and Jacks.
  • Wire and Black Corals adorning the wreck are full of tiny Baitfish during plankton blooming. 

History

  • Japanese army cargo ship.
  • Built between 1942–1944.
  • Teshio was heading north into the Toachel Mlengui Passage as part of the 21st Wewak re-supply convoy.
  • Crippled by shafting and bombing by USS Bunker Hill SBD’s (navy single-engine fighter planes).
  • Drifted down the main channel and was beached for a couple of years.
  • Slipped off the reef and sank. Now it lies on its starboard side. 

Artifacts

  • Salvaged armament: small gun mounted on bow.

Zeke Fighter

Marine Life

  • Huge intact Staghorn Corals and Plate Corals offer shelter to many varieties of tropical fish.
  • Whip Corals, Soft Corals and Black Corals cover the wreck.
  • Black-Bar Barracuda, Jacks, Groupers, Fusiliers, Anthias, Lionfish and other reef fish found in and around the structure.
  • Mast has loads of Blue-Green Chromis, Anemones and Lobsters. 

Depth

  • 4-6 ft/2 m; SNORKEL ONLY.
  • Only accessible at high tide. 

History

  • Also known as Hamp/Hap/Zero.
  • Japanese – Mitsubishi A6m3 – Navy Carrier Fighter.
  • Built in 1940.
  • Single-winged, single-seat carrier-borne fighter.
  • Speeds up to 309 knots.
  • Range of 2380 miles.
  • Canopy, cockpit instruments and left wing missing.
  • Damaged in dogfight during the March 30-31, 1944, Desecrate One Operation.
  • Highly skilled Japanese pilot landed the craft mostly intact in the shallow waters. 

Armament

  • 7.7 mm machine gun (now removed).
  • 20 mm cannon barrel extensions mounted on wing.

Marine Life

  • Small tropical fish, shrimps and Banded Pipefish.

Important Tips

  • DO NOT PICK UP AMMUNITION!!! Very unstable and can explode.

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